Tag Archives: workshop

Best Way to Sign Your Art Work

Your name is the primary way people find you.  A readable name on your art work  is one of the best marketing tools you have.   USE IT!

If people like your work and can read your name, it gives them a chance to find you on the web. If they can’t read your name, the opportunity is missed, perhaps forever.  Many artists don’t do this and think people will somehow magically find them.  Don’t count on it.

A world famous artist friend actually prints her name alining it using a ruler.  It is very readable, consistent and recognizable on her work.  She sets a great example for us!

I suggest printing your name on your work!!!!!!!!!!!!

I wish you the best with your marketing challenges!

Steve

How to Build Long Term Success

If you want to build long term success, read this short article written by Aletta de Wal,  because, as she states, “we listen for a sale rather than build relationships”.

Beginning of Article

One of the most frequent complaints I hear from artists is that people browsing say they like their art, but then don’t buy it. But. . . that’s a lot of pressure to put on a walk-by comment! Not to mention, it’s unrealistic to expect sales from a first look. (And viewing people just as wallets eliminates any chance of a bigger relationship.)

I always walk the full gallery or show before going back to look at individual art. If I want to live with a piece of art for a long time, I want to have ample time to absorb what’s available. Then I go back to my short list and engage in conversation with the artists. The way they handle the conversation has a big impact on what I choose.

Besides, it’s stingy of you not to glory in the accolade for at least a moment. Accept what people say as the beginning of a process, then consider the compliment an opening to start a conversation by asking questions to learn what’s behind the comment.  What do they like about your art? What does it remind them of? What brought them to the exhibit?

Each answer leads you a bit further past a throw-away comment and into the realm of a possible relationship. Who knows where that could lead? A new art friend, a potential collector, a source of referrals to buyers, a gallery opportunity. . . ?

In the end, when you look at people as people first, and work at building relationships instead of pursuing transactions, you can much more easily build bridges between you, your art, and your audience. And THAT’S how you build long-term success.

End of quote.

When it comes to signing people up for wildlife pastel workshops, making a sale from our gallery or an art show, I completely agree with the author!  Getting to know people and building a relationship is how you build long term success!  People don’t usually purchase major items at first glance.  My experience is 7 or 8 times before they are ready.  I believe in the no pressure sale.  I hate pushy sales people. Give your customers time. Be ready when they are.  Make the buying process easy for them.  This experience will give both of you the best feeling.  It also increases your chances of repeat sales in the future, and that’s a good thing.

And remember, People do business with people they like.  So, work on your “people skills” and get them to tell you about themselves and what they like about your art.  This business is not about you. It’s about knowing your customer and giving them what they want when they are ready to take action.   Share your life.  Make a new friend.

Steve

 

 

Wolf Workshop March 2015 at Rebecca Baer’s Studio

I will be teaching a workshop in Rebecca Baer’s studio in Hagerstown, MD. Check out the link. Hope you will join us!!

Wolf Workshop

Workshop Wolf

 

 

 

Open Studio

On August 23 &24 I am having an Open Studio. What that means is if you are a previous student of mine, familiar with how I work, you will have opportunity to come and work. I will help you to complete or work on your project, answering questions and helping you make good color choices. Workshop1

Often we know WHERE we want to go with a painting but not HOW to get there. I can help you with that. Each participant will receive a mounted sheet of velour as well. Come and join us!!

Using Less Than Perfect Photos

if you work from photos , sometimes you will come across a reference that you love but that isn’t quite right.  What do we do to fix that less than perfect photo? That is the subject of this weekend’s pastel workshop. below is the photo reference for my painting:

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This photo by Ron McGinnis portrays a tender moment between mom and her baby. I wanted to paint that. But there are some problems. The back of the horse is a bit hard to figure out and the legs are definitely awkward.

The first thing I did was eliminate the background and add a new one.

Secondly, the horse doesn’t have too much definition. You can’t really see the eye very well or any muscles or veins. So I went in search of better reference. here is my finished painting:

Horse and Foal Finish1

I am happy with the way it turned out.